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Cell Host Microbe. 2018 Nov 14;24(5):637-652.e8. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2018.10.001. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Plant-Derived Exosomal MicroRNAs Shape the Gut Microbiota.

Author information

1
James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Louisville, CTRB 309, 505 Hancock Street, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. Electronic address: yun.teng@louisville.edu.
2
Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, The Affiliated Huaian No. 1 People's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Huaian, Jiangsu 223300, China.
3
Department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA.
4
Department of Genomic Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
5
James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Louisville, CTRB 309, 505 Hancock Street, Louisville, KY 40202, USA.
6
Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA.
7
Kidney Disease Program and Clinical Proteomics Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA.
8
Robley Rex Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, KY 40206, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202, USA.
9
Department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA; KBRIN Bioinformatics Core, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA.
10
Robley Rex Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, KY 40206, USA; James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Louisville, CTRB 309, 505 Hancock Street, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. Electronic address: h0zhan17@louisville.edu.

Abstract

The gut microbiota can be altered by dietary interventions to prevent and treat various diseases. However, the mechanisms by which food products modulate commensals remain largely unknown. We demonstrate that plant-derived exosome-like nanoparticles (ELNs) are taken up by the gut microbiota and contain RNAs that alter microbiome composition and host physiology. Ginger ELNs (GELNs) are preferentially taken up by Lactobacillaceae in a GELN lipid-dependent manner and contain microRNAs that target various genes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG). Among these, GELN mdo-miR7267-3p-mediated targeting of the LGG monooxygenase ycnE yields increased indole-3-carboxaldehyde (I3A). GELN-RNAs or I3A, a ligand for aryl hydrocarbon receptor, are sufficient to induce production of IL-22, which is linked to barrier function improvement. These functions of GELN-RNAs can ameliorate mouse colitis via IL-22-dependent mechanisms. These findings reveal how plant products and their effects on the microbiome may be used to target specific host processes to alleviate disease.

KEYWORDS:

IL-22; LexA; and LGG adherence; ginger exosome-like nanoparticle; gut microbiota composition; lipid targeting; miRNA/mRNA interaction; small RNA; tryptophan metabolites

PMID:
30449315
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2018.10.001

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