Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biol Psychiatry. 2018 Oct 9. pii: S0006-3223(18)31925-5. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.09.027. [Epub ahead of print]

Probing Brain Developmental Patterns of Myelination and Associations With Psychopathology in Youths UsingGray/White Matter Contrast.

Author information

1
Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: l.c.b.norbom@psykologi.uio.no.
2
Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
3
Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
4
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychiatry, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cerebral myeloarchitecture shows substantial development across childhood and adolescence, and aberrations in these trajectories are relevant for a range of mental disorders. Differential myelination between intracortical and subjacent white matter can be approximated using signal intensities in T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

METHODS:

To test the sensitivity of gray/white matter contrast (GWC) to age and individual differences in psychopathology and general cognitive ability in youths (8-23 years), we formed data-driven psychopathology and cognitive components using a large population-based sample, the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (N = 6487, 52% female). We then tested for associations with regional GWC defined by an independent component analysis in a subsample with available magnetic resonance imaging data (n = 1467, 53% female).

RESULTS:

The analyses revealed a global GWC component, which showed an age-related decrease from late childhood and across adolescence. In addition, we found regional anatomically meaningful components with differential age associations explaining variance beyond the global component. When accounting for age and sex, both higher symptom levels of anxiety or prodromal psychosis and lower cognitive ability were associated with higher GWC in insula and cingulate cortices and with lower GWC in pre- and postcentral cortices. We also found several additional regional associations with anxiety, prodromal psychosis, and cognitive ability.

CONCLUSIONS:

Independent modes of GWC variation are sensitive to global and regional brain developmental processes, possibly related to differences between intracortical and subjacent white matter myelination, and individual differences in regional GWC are associated with both mental health and general cognitive functioning.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescence; Brain development; MRI; Mental health; Myelination; Signal intensity

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for Norwegian BIBSYS system
Loading ...
Support Center