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Chemosphere. 2018 Nov 9;217:629-635. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.10.218. [Epub ahead of print]

Neurobehavioral effects of bisphenol S exposure in early life stages of zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio).

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China; Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China; Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing, 210042, China. Electronic address: gujie1993@njmu.edu.cn.
2
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China; Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China. Electronic address: zhangjiayao@njmu.edu.cn.
3
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China; Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China. Electronic address: chenyaoyao92@njmu.edu.cn.
4
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China; Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China. Electronic address: 771647652@qq.com.
5
Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing, 210042, China. Electronic address: guomin@nies.org.
6
Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing, 210042, China. Electronic address: wanglei@nies.org.
7
Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing, 210042, China. Electronic address: wangzhen@nies.org.
8
Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing, 210042, China. Electronic address: wsm@nies.org.
9
Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing, 210042, China. Electronic address: sll@nies.org.
10
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China; Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 210029, China. Electronic address: aihuagu@njmu.edu.cn.
11
Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing, 210042, China. Electronic address: jgx@nies.org.

Abstract

As an alternate of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol S (BPS) is now widely used to produce our daily consumer goods. Some studies have shown that BPS has the potential to disrupt the reproduction and glucose homeostasis. However, the impact of BPS on the nervous system remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of BPS on the nervous systems of zebrafish in their early growing stages. The 96 h-LC50 value of BPS to zebrafish larvae was 323 mg/L (95%CI: 308-339 mg/L). Zebrafish embryos were exposed to BPS at concentrations of 0, 0.03, 0.3 and 3.0 mg/L until 6 days postfertilization. Our results showed that 0.3 and 3.0 mg/L BPS exposure markedly decreased locomotor behavior, accompany by the increased oxidative stress, promoted apoptosis and altered retinal structure in zebrafish. In addition, the expression levels of six neurodevelopment genes (α1-tubulin, elavl3, gap43, mbp, syn2a and gfap) were downregulated after 3.0 mg/L BPS treatment. In conclusion, BPS may affect locomotor behavior and alter retinal structure in zebrafish larvae partially by increasing oxidative stress, and by suppressing the expression levels of neurodevelopment genes.

KEYWORDS:

BPS; Developmental neurotoxicity; Locomotor behavior

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