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Ann Epidemiol. 2019 Jan;29:39-45. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.10.004. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Cell phone use and risk of thyroid cancer: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.
2
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.
3
National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
4
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.
6
Endocrine Neoplasm Institute, Miami Cancer Institute, Miami, FL.
7
Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. Electronic address: yawei.zhang@yale.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study aims to investigate the association between cell phone use and thyroid cancer.

METHODS:

A population-based case-control study was conducted in Connecticut between 2010 and 2011 including 462 histologically confirmed thyroid cancer cases and 498 population-based controls. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for associations between cell phone use and thyroid cancer.

RESULTS:

Cell phone use was not associated with thyroid cancer (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.74-1.48). A suggestive increase in risk of thyroid microcarcinoma (tumor size ≤10 mm) was observed for long-term and more frequent users. Compared with cell phone nonusers, several groups had nonstatistically significantly increased risk of thyroid microcarcinoma: individuals who had used a cell phone >15 years (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.83-2.00), who had used a cell phone >2 hours per day (OR: 1.40, 95% CI: 0.83-2.35), who had the most cumulative use hours (OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 0.98-2.54), and who had the most cumulative calls (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 0.78-1.84).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study found no significant association between cell phone use and thyroid cancer. A suggestive elevated risk of thyroid microcarcinoma associated with long-term and more frequent uses warrants further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

Case–control study; Cell phone; Nonionizing radiation; Thyroid cancer

PMID:
30446214
PMCID:
PMC6344271
[Available on 2020-01-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.10.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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