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BMC Infect Dis. 2018 Nov 16;18(1):578. doi: 10.1186/s12879-018-3482-1.

Case report: two confirmed cases of human Seoul virus infections in Indonesia.

Author information

1
Universitas Indonesia, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
2
INA-RESPOND, NIHRD, Ministry of Health Republic of Indonesia Building 4 (Laboratorium Terpadu), 5th Floor, Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 29, Jakarta, 10560, Indonesia.
3
INA-RESPOND, NIHRD, Ministry of Health Republic of Indonesia Building 4 (Laboratorium Terpadu), 5th Floor, Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 29, Jakarta, 10560, Indonesia. hkosasih@ina-respond.net.
4
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA.
5
National Institute of Health Research and Development (NIHRD), Ministry of Health Republic of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia.
6
Universitas Airlangga, Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Seoul virus (SEOV) is a member of hantavirus family, which is transmitted to humans by Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus. Diagnosing SEOV infection is difficult because the clinical presentations are often undifferentiated with other viral or bacterial infections and assays to test antibodies seroconversion and RNA detection are not available in resource-limited setting like Indonesia.

CASE PRESENTATION:

We report two confirmed cases of SEOV infection from Indonesia. Here, we illustrate the clinical presentations, hematology and biochemistry profiles, and outcomes of the two cases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that SEOV sequences have highest homology to isolates obtained from rodents in Indonesia.

CONCLUSIONS:

This report highlights the importance of considering SEOV infection in febrile patients with lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevation of liver enzyme despite the absence of hemorrhagic manifestations and renal syndromes. The public health importance of rodent-borne diseases such as SEOV infection urges an integrated epidemiological surveillance both in humans and rodents in Indonesia.

KEYWORDS:

Detection; Indonesia; Seoul virus

PMID:
30445913
PMCID:
PMC6240170
DOI:
10.1186/s12879-018-3482-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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