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J Thorac Oncol. 2019 Mar;14(3):436-444. doi: 10.1016/j.jtho.2018.11.002. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Role of Low-Dose Computerized Tomography in Lung Cancer Screening among Never-Smokers.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang-Gu, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang-Gu, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.
3
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang-Gu, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: ctlee@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The incidence of lung cancer among never-smokers has been increasing rapidly. The U. S. National Lung Screening Trial and the NELSON trial showed that screening using low-dose computerized tomography (LDCT) effectively reduced lung cancer mortality among heavy smokers. However, its effectiveness in never-smokers has not been well investigated. This study investigated the role of LDCT in lung cancer screening among never-smokers.

METHODS:

The study was designed as a single-center, retrospective cohort study. We analyzed the data on patients who underwent LDCT screening between May 2003 and June 2016. Nodules detected by computerized tomography were classified according to the Lung Imaging Reporting and Data System criteria. The detection rate and lung cancer outcomes (type of cancer, staging of lung cancer, and mortality) according to smoking history were determined.

RESULTS:

Of the 28,807 enrolled patients, 12,176 were never-smokers; of these patients, 7744 (63.6%) were women and 1218 (10.0%) were found to have lung nodules. Overall, lung cancer was diagnosed in 55 never-smokers (0.45%). In contrast, lung cancer was diagnosed in 143 (0.86%) of the 16,631 ever-smokers. Of the never-smokers with lung cancer, 51 (92.7%) presented with stage I disease, and all patients had adenocarcinomas.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the never-smoker population, LDCT screening helped to detect a significant number of lung cancers. Most of these lung cancers were detected at a very early stage. The positive results of the National Lung Screening Trial in the United States and the NELSON trial may have established the value of LDCT screening for heavy smokers, but future research should consider the value of using LDCT screening in the never-smoker population.

KEYWORDS:

Adenocarcinoma; Low-dose chest computerized tomography; Lung cancer; Never-smoker

PMID:
30445189
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtho.2018.11.002

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