Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 Nov 15;8(1):16896. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-35171-3.

Soy-Induced Fecal Metabolome Changes in Ovariectomized and Intact Female Rats: Relationship with Cardiometabolic Health.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA.
2
Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53706, USA.
3
Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA.
4
Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA.
5
MU Metabolomics Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA.
6
Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA.
7
Bond Life Sciences Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA.
8
Bond Life Sciences Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA. rosenfeldc@missouri.edu.
9
Biomedical Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA. rosenfeldc@missouri.edu.
10
Thompson Center for Autism and Neurobehavioral Disorders, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA. rosenfeldc@missouri.edu.
11
Genetics Area Program, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA. rosenfeldc@missouri.edu.

Abstract

Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds found in a variety of foods, most notably, soy. These compounds have been shown to improve immuno-metabolic health, yet mechanisms remain uncertain. We demonstrated previously that dietary phytoestrogen-rich soy (SOY) rescued metabolic dysfunction/inflammation following ovariectomy (OVX) in female rats; we also noted remarkable shifts in gut microbiota in SOY vs control diet-fed rats. Importantly, specific bacteria that significantly increased in those fed the SOY correlated positively with several favorable host metabolic parameters. One mechanism by which gut microbes might lead to such host effects is through production of bacterial metabolites. To test this possibility, we utilized non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) to assess the fecal metabolome in those previously studied animals. Partial least square discriminant analysis (PLSDA) revealed clear separation of fecal metabolomes based on diet and ovarian state. In particular, SOY-fed animals had greater fecal concentrations of the beneficial bacterial metabolite, S-equol, which was positively associated with several of the bacteria upregulated in the SOY group. S-equol was inversely correlated with important indicators of metabolic dysfunction and inflammation, suggesting that this metabolite might be a key mediator between SOY and gut microbiome-positive host health outcomes.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center