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Science. 2018 Nov 16;362(6416):764-770. doi: 10.1126/science.aau2096.

Dietary fat: From foe to friend?

Author information

1
New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. david.ludwig@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
5
Cancer Prevention Program, Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

For decades, dietary advice was based on the premise that high intakes of fat cause obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and possibly cancer. Recently, evidence for the adverse metabolic effects of processed carbohydrate has led to a resurgence in interest in lower-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets with high fat content. However, some argue that the relative quantity of dietary fat and carbohydrate has little relevance to health and that focus should instead be placed on which particular fat or carbohydrate sources are consumed. This review, by nutrition scientists with widely varying perspectives, summarizes existing evidence to identify areas of broad consensus amid ongoing controversy regarding macronutrients and chronic disease.

PMID:
30442800
DOI:
10.1126/science.aau2096

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