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Surg Endosc. 2018 Nov 13. doi: 10.1007/s00464-018-6587-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Surgical trainee impact on bariatric surgery safety.

Author information

1
Division of Bariatric, Foregut and Advanced Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stony Brook University Medical Center, 100 Nichols Road, HSC T19, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA.
2
Department of Family, Population and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA.
3
Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA.
4
Division of Bariatric, Foregut and Advanced Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stony Brook University Medical Center, 100 Nichols Road, HSC T19, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA. konstantinos.spaniolas@stonybrookmedicine.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are commonly performed bariatric procedures that are associated with a significant learning curve. The effect of surgeon experience on perioperative outcomes and safety is established, but the effect of trainee participation remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of trainees on early perioperative safety of bariatric surgery.

METHODS:

Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program database for 2015 was used to identify non-revisional laparoscopic and robotic RYGB and SG procedures. Comparisons were made based on assistant level. Multivariable logistic and linear regression methodology was used to compare clinical outcomes.

RESULTS:

There were 35,354 laparoscopic RYGB, 2896 robotic RYGB, 79,717 laparoscopic SG, and 5449 robotic SG procedures examined. 21,257 (17%) and 11,322 (9%) of all procedures were performed with a resident or fellow, respectively. Fellow presence was independently associated with the development of complications for all procedure types except robotic SG when compared to non-trainee [odds ratio (OR) 1.31, 2.20, 1.28 for laparoscopic RYGB, robotic RYGB, and laparoscopic SG, respectively]. The most common events were urinary tract and superficial surgical site infections. This negative impact of fellow on overall complications was eliminated after accounting for operative duration. In laparoscopic SG, resident participation was associated with higher leak rate (OR 1.61), readmission (OR 1.18), re-intervention (OR 1.4), and complication rate (OR 1.32) compared to non-trainee, even after accounting for procedural duration. In robotic SG, there was no impact of trainee on outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although fellow training is associated with higher overall complication rate, there is no such impact on major safety benchmarks, including leak rate and re-operation. In contrast, the impact of resident trainees on SG outcomes is substantial. Operative involvement of trainees in bariatric surgery leads to different outcomes based on trainee level and should be judiciously considered during the programmatic design of bariatric educational curricula.

KEYWORDS:

Bariatric; Fellowship training; Resident training; Robotic; Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass; Sleeve gastrectomy

PMID:
30426255
DOI:
10.1007/s00464-018-6587-0

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