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J Hum Hypertens. 2019 Mar;33(3):237-247. doi: 10.1038/s41371-018-0130-6. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Benefits of mindfulness meditation in reducing blood pressure and stress in patients with arterial hypertension.

Author information

1
Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Internal Medicine Service, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk Unit, Barcelona, Spain. paola_ponte@yahoo.com.
2
Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Institut de Reserca, Internal Medicine, Barcelona, Spain. paola_ponte@yahoo.com.
3
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, School of Medicine, Bellaterra, Spain. paola_ponte@yahoo.com.
4
Institut de Recerca, Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Deu, Teaching, Research and Innovation Unit Sant Boi de Llobregat, Llobregat, Spain.
5
Primary Care Prevention and Health Promotion Research Network (RedIAPP), Madrid, Spain.
6
Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Internal Medicine Service, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk Unit, Barcelona, Spain.
7
Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Occupational Health Service, Barcelona, Spain.
8
Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Psychiatry Service, Barcelona, Spain.
9
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, School of Medicine, Bellaterra, Spain.
10
Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Institut de Reserca, Internal Medicine, Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

The objective of this randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the benefits of mindfulness meditation in controlling ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and the impact of the intervention on anxiety, stress and depression levels in a Mediterranean population. Twenty-four and 18 patients [n = 42; mean age 56.5 (7.7) years; similar men and women proportions] with high-normal BP or grade I hypertension were enrolled to an intervention and a control group, respectively. For 2 h/week over 8 weeks, the intervention group received mindfulness training and the control group attended health education talks. The patients attended pre-intervention, week 4, week 8 and week 20 follow-up visits. 61.9% of the patients had anxiety, 21.4% depression, 19.0% were smokers and 14.2% were diabetic (no significant differences between the 2 groups). At baseline, the intervention group had non-significant higher clinically measured BP values, whereas both groups had similar ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) values. At week 8, the intervention group had statistically significant lower ABPM scores than the control group (124/77 mmHg vs 126/80 mmHg (p < 0.05) and 108/65 mmHg vs 114/69 mmHg (p < 0.05) for 24-h and night-time systolic BP (SBP), respectively) and also had lower clinically measured SBP values (130 mmHg vs 133 mmHg; p = 0.02). At week 20 (follow-up), means were lower in the intervention group (although not statistically significant). Improvements were observed in the intervention group in terms of being less judgemental, more accepting and less depressed. In conclusion, by week 8 the mindfulness group had lower clinically measured SBP, 24-h SBP, at-rest SBP and diastolic BP values.

PMID:
30425326
DOI:
10.1038/s41371-018-0130-6

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