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Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Nov 13;67(suppl_2):S142-S145. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy694.

China-United States Research Collaborations in Antimicrobial Resistance.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
2
Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
3
Institute for Infectious Diseases and Public Health, GlaxoSmithKline Research and Development, Beijing.
4
Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine.
5
Key Laboratory of Microbial Technology and Bioinformatics of Zhejiang Province.
6
State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China.
7
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
8
Beijing Ditan Hospital.
9
Clinical Center for HIV/AIDS, Capital Medical University.
10
Department of Infectious Disease, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College.
11
Center for Respiratory Diseases and.
12
Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, China-Japan Friendship Hospital.
13
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing.
14
Institute of Antibiotics, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

A strong synergy can result from China-US antimicrobial resistance (AMR) collaborations given similarities and differences between their respective healthcare systems and research infrastructures. The Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group has employed a model of realistic growth, starting with a feasible, relatively low-resource observational study in a critical priority pathogen. This and other observational studies will provide vital scientific information required for the rational design of future interventional trials. In addition, it provides a mutual, low-risk opportunity for determining the strengths and opportunities of the research collaboration. Issues identified during the observational studies can be addressed prior to the initiation of high-resource interventional studies. Collaborative clinical AMR studies between China and the United States have tremendous potential to decrease AMR rates, improve responsible antibiotic use, and ultimately improve the lives of patients in both countries.

PMID:
30423056
PMCID:
PMC6233675
[Available on 2019-11-13]
DOI:
10.1093/cid/ciy694

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