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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2018 Nov 13. doi: 10.1002/oby.22350. [Epub ahead of print]

Geographic Variation in Obesity, Behavioral Treatment, and Bariatric Surgery for Veterans.

Author information

1
Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
2
Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
3
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
4
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
6
Center for Health Services Research in Older Adults, Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USA.
7
Department of Health Services, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
8
Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
9
William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
10
Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
11
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of North Dakota, Fargo, North Dakota, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aims to describe geographic variation in veterans' prevalence of obesity, participation in Veterans Health Administration's behavioral weight management program (MOVE!), and receipt of bariatric surgery in fiscal year (FY) 2016.

METHODS:

In this retrospective cohort study of veterans with obesity who received Veterans Health Administration care in FY2016, electronic health record data were obtained on weight, height, outpatient visits to the MOVE! program, and bariatric surgeries. For each Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) region, the prevalence rate of veterans with obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 ), MOVE! participation rates, and bariatric surgery rates are presented.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of obesity in veterans ranged from 30.5% to 40.5% across VISNs in FY2016. MOVE! participation among veterans with obesity was low (2.8%-6.9%) across all VISNs, but veterans with class II and III obesity (BMI ≥ 35) had higher MOVE! participation rates (4.3%-10.8%) than veterans with class I obesity. There was 20-fold variation across VISNs in receipt of bariatric surgery among veterans with BMI ≥ 35, ranging from 0.01% to 0.2%. Among veterans with BMI ≥ 35 participating in MOVE!, there was 46-fold variation in bariatric surgery provision, ranging from 0.07% to 3.27%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite veterans' high prevalence of obesity, behavioral and surgical weight management participation is low and varies across regions.

PMID:
30421849
DOI:
10.1002/oby.22350

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