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Cancer Causes Control. 2018 Nov 12. doi: 10.1007/s10552-018-1093-1. [Epub ahead of print]

Serum glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol in relation to prostate cancer death in the Swedish AMORIS study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, USA. rhonda.arthur@einstein.yu.edu.
2
Translational Oncology & Urology Research, Kings College London, London, UK. rhonda.arthur@einstein.yu.edu.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park, Bronx, NY, USA. rhonda.arthur@einstein.yu.edu.
4
Translational Oncology & Urology Research, Kings College London, London, UK.
5
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
6
Department of Biobank Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
7
Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
8
Biostatistics, Data Management and Medical Writing, Research & Development, Swedish Orphan Biovitrum (Sobi), Stockholm, Sweden.
9
Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
10
Medical Evidence & Observational Research, Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
11
Department of Urology, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
12
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet and CALAB Research, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Lifestyle-related conditions such as obesity are associated with prostate cancer progression, but the associations with hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are unclear. This study, therefore, aims to examine the association of glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol with prostate cancer death.

METHODS:

From the Swedish AMORIS cohort, we selected 14,150 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1996 and 2011 who had prediagnostic measurements of serum glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to determine the hazard ratios for death in relation to the aforementioned metabolic markers.

RESULTS:

Using clinical cut-off points, a non-significant positive association was observed between glucose and prostate cancer death. When compared to those with glucose in the lowest quartile, those in the highest quartile had greater risk of prostate cancer death (HR 1.19; 95% CI 1.02-1.39). However, neither total cholesterol nor triglycerides were associated with prostate cancer death. Glucose and triglycerides were positively associated with overall, cardiovascular, and other deaths. Hypercholesterolemia was only associated with risk of CVD death.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that glucose levels may influence prostate cancer survival, but further studies using repeated measurements are needed to further elucidate how glucose levels may influence prostate cancer progression.

KEYWORDS:

AMORIS; Glucose; Prostate cancer; Total cholesterol; Triglycerides

PMID:
30421156
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-018-1093-1

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