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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2019 Mar;28(3):616-619. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-0909. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Dietary Acrylamide Is Not Associated with Renal Cell Cancer Risk in the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort.

Author information

1
Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia. marji.mccullough@cancer.org.
2
Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Acrylamide, an industrial chemical and probable human carcinogen, can be formed in primarily carbohydrate-containing foods during high-heat cooking or processing. Most epidemiologic studies show no associations of dietary acrylamide intake with most cancer outcomes, but limited prospective evidence suggests a positive association with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

METHODS:

In 1999, 102,154 men and women from the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort completed a questionnaire on diet, lifestyle, and cancer risk factors and were followed through June 30, 2013. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the HR and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between estimated dietary acrylamide intake and risk of RCC.

RESULTS:

After 1,137,441 person-years of follow-up, 412 cases of invasive RCC occurred. In multivariable-adjusted models, there was no association between acrylamide intake and risk of RCC (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.82-1.43) for the highest versus lowest quartile of intake. Associations were not modified by sex or smoking history.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found no associations between dietary acrylamide exposure and risk of invasive RCC.

IMPACT:

The findings from this large, prospective analysis do not support a positive association between higher dietary acrylamide intake and RCC risk.

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