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Alzheimers Dement (Amst). 2018 Sep 27;10:669-677. doi: 10.1016/j.dadm.2018.08.012. eCollection 2018.

Utility of perfusion PET measures to assess neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
2
Banner Alzheimer's Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
3
Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
5
Dementia Research Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
6
Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
8
Neuroscience Department Laboratories, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
9
Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
10
Departments of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
11
Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
12
Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
13
Center for Neuroimaging, Department of Radiology and Imaging Science, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
14
Laboratory of Neuroimaging, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

Introduction:

18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is commonly used to estimate neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we evaluate the utility of dynamic PET measures of perfusion using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) to estimate neuronal injury in comparison to FDG PET.

Methods:

FDG, early frames of PiB images, and relative PiB delivery rate constants (PiB-R1) were obtained from 110 participants from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network. Voxelwise, regional cross-sectional, and longitudinal analyses were done to evaluate the correlation between images and estimate the relationship of the imaging biomarkers with estimated time to disease progression based on family history.

Results:

Metabolism and perfusion images were spatially correlated. Regional PiB-R1 values and FDG, but not early frames of PiB images, significantly decreased in the mutation carriers with estimated year to onset and with increasing dementia severity.

Discussion:

Hypometabolism estimated by PiB-R1 may provide a measure of brain perfusion without increasing radiation exposure.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; FDG; Neuronal injury; Perfusion; PiB

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