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Tob Regul Sci. 2018 Sep;4(5):84-91. doi: 10.18001/TRS.4.5.8.

Reduced Nicotine Content Cigarettes and Cannabis Use in Vulnerable Populations.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Vermont Center on Tobacco Regulatory Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.
2
Predoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychological Science, Vermont Center on Tobacco Regulatory Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.
3
Research Associate, Department of Medical Biostatistics, Vermont Center on Tobacco Regulatory Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.
4
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Vermont Center on Tobacco Regulatory Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.
5
Research Assistant, Vermont Center on Tobacco Regulatory Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.
6
Associate Professor, Departments of Psychiatry & Psychological Science, Vermont Center on Tobacco Regulatory Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.
7
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior, Brown University, Providence, RI.
8
Professor, Departments of Psychiatry & Psychological Science, Vermont Center on Tobacco Regulatory Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.

Abstract

Objective: We estimated whether recent cannabis use moderates response to cigarettes varying in nicotine content (0.4, 2.4, 5.2, 15.8 mg/g) among smokers with concurrent affective disorders, opioid dependence, or socioeconomic disadvantage. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of a multi-site, double-blind, laboratory study examining acute response to reduced nicotine content cigarettes (RNCC) in 169 adult smokers with co-morbid conditions. Participants positive for recent cannabis use or self-reported past 30-day cannabis use at baseline were categorized as current cannabis users (N = 63). Repeated measures analysis of variance tests assessed whether baseline cannabis use moderated cigarette reinforcement, tobacco withdrawal, craving, smoking topography, or carbon monoxide boost. Results: Cannabis users were younger, less educated, and had more depression and anxiety than non-users (p < .05). Cannabis use status did not moderate the effects of nicotine dose on concurrent choice testing, subjective effects of RNCCs, or smoking topography. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, cannabis users had higher ratings on Smoking Satisfaction, Enjoyment of Respiratory Tract Sensations, and Craving Reduction across all nicotine doses. Cannabis users reported longer withdrawal symptom duration and more rapid decline of carbon monoxide boost than non-users. Conclusions: Findings suggest RNCCs decrease the addiction potential of cigarettes in vulnerable populations independent of cannabis use status.

KEYWORDS:

cannabis; marijuana; nicotine reduction; smoking; tobacco regulation; vulnerable populations

PMID:
30417034
PMCID:
PMC6219758
[Available on 2019-09-01]
DOI:
10.18001/TRS.4.5.8

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