Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatr Cardiol. 2019 Feb;40(2):310-318. doi: 10.1007/s00246-018-2019-0. Epub 2018 Nov 10.

Birth Location of Infants with Critical Congenital Heart Disease in California.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, Palo Alto, CA, USA. npurkey@stanford.edu.
2
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
3
Quantitative Sciences Unit, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
4
Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, Palo Alto, CA, USA.

Abstract

The American Academy of Pediatrics classifies neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) from level I to IV based on the acuity of care each unit can provide. Birth in a higher level center is associated with lower morbidity and mortality in high-risk populations. Congenital heart disease accounts for 25-50% of infant mortality related to birth defects in the U.S., but recent data are lacking on where infants with critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) are born. We used a linked dataset from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development to access ICD-9 diagnosis codes for all infants born in California from 2008 to 2012. We compared infants with CCHD to the general population, identified where infants with CCHD were born based on NICU level of care, and predicted level IV birth among infants with CCHD using logistic regression techniques. From 2008 to 2012, 6325 infants with CCHD were born in California, with 23.7% of infants with CCHD born at a level IV NICU compared to 8.4% of the general population. Level IV birth for infants with CCHD was associated with lower gestational age, higher maternal age and education, the presence of other congenital anomalies, and the diagnosis of a single ventricle lesion. More infants with CCHD are born in a level IV NICU compared to the general population. Future studies are needed to determine if birth in a lower level of care center impacts outcomes for infants with CCHD.

KEYWORDS:

Birth location; California; Congenital heart disease; Neonatal intensive care; Prevalence

PMID:
30415381
DOI:
10.1007/s00246-018-2019-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center