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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019 May;143(5):1769-1782.e11. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2018.10.040. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Innate immune crosstalk in asthmatic airways: Innate lymphoid cells coordinate polarization of lung macrophages.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Mucosal Immunology in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea.
3
Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea; Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
4
Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; Laboratory of Immune Regulation in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
5
Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea; Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: helenmed@snu.ac.kr.
6
Laboratory of Mucosal Immunology in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: hykim11@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent studies have emphasized the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the development of asthma. The involvement of group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) in asthma is well studied: however, the participation of other types of ILCs in the development of asthma remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aims to understand the role of various ILCs in patients with asthma, especially their effect on macrophage polarization.

METHODS:

Each subset of ILCs and macrophages in induced sputum from 51 steroid-naive patients with asthma and 18 healthy donors was analyzed by using flow cytometry. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were sorted and cocultured with each subset of ILCs to determine whether the polarization of macrophages could be regulated by ILCs.

RESULTS:

In addition to ILC2s, numbers of group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1s) and group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) were increased in induced sputum from asthmatic patients when compared with those in healthy control subjects. The dominance of macrophages in induced sputum was more prominent in asthmatic patients than in healthy control subjects. A positive correlation between numbers of ILC2s and numbers of M2 macrophages and those of ILC1s/ILC3s and M1 macrophages was observed. Coculture of ILC2s with AMs induced expression of M2 macrophage-related genes, whereas coculture of ILC1s and ILC3s with AMs induced expression of M1 macrophage-related genes through cytokine secretion, as well as cell-cell contact. According to the inflammatory signature, patients with eosinophilic asthma have more ILC2s and M2 macrophages, and those with noneosinophilic asthma have an M1 macrophage-dominant profile.

CONCLUSION:

A different subset of ILCs regulates macrophage polarization, contributing to developing the distinct phenotype of asthma.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; asthma phenotype; induced sputum; innate lymphoid cells; macrophage; polarization

PMID:
30414858
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2018.10.040

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