Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Schizophr Res. 2019 Apr;206:386-393. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2018.10.014. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Prevalence, course and psychosis-predictive value of negative symptoms in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

Author information

1
Developmental Imaging and Psychopathology lab, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Center for Contextual Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: Maude.Schneider@unige.ch.
2
Developmental Imaging and Psychopathology lab, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Child and Adolescence Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Children Hospital Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: marco.armando@unige.ch.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany.
4
Child and Adolescence Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Children Hospital Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy.
5
Developmental Imaging and Psychopathology lab, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Developmental Clinical Psychology Unit, Faculty of Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland; Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, UK.
6
Developmental Imaging and Psychopathology lab, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, School of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is one of the highest known risk factors for schizophrenia and recent findings have highlighted the clinical relevance of ultra-high risk (UHR) criteria in this population. However, studies in other at-risk populations have shown that the presence of negative symptoms (NS) is also of clinical relevance in predicting transition to psychosis. The present study examined in detail the presence and course of NS in 22q11DS, as well as their value in predicting transition to psychosis.

METHODS:

A total of 111 participants aged between 8 and 33 years were assessed with the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS). A follow-up assessment was available for 89 individuals.

RESULTS:

Core NS of at least moderate severity were present in 50.5% of the sample and were more severe in individuals meeting UHR criteria. They predominantly remained stable over time and their emergence between baseline and follow-up assessment was associated with significant functional decline. Some NS were significant predictors of conversion to psychosis and the emergence/persistence of psychosis risk.

CONCLUSIONS:

Altogether, these findings highlight that NS are core manifestations of psychosis in individuals with 22q11DS that strongly impact global functioning. The presence of NS should be a primary target of early therapeutic intervention in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescence; Global functioning; Longitudinal; Schizophrenia; Transition

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center