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Pediatrics. 2018 Dec;142(6). pii: e20180422. doi: 10.1542/peds.2018-0422. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Online Family Problem-solving Treatment for Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

Author information

1
Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine, shari.wade@cchmc.org.
2
Departments of Pediatrics and.
3
Department of Statistics.
4
Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine.
5
Statistics, and.
6
Mathematical Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.
7
Departments of Pediatrics, Neurology, and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, and.
8
Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, and.
9
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; and.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Research Institute, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.
11
The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
12
Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether online family problem-solving treatment (OFPST) is more effective in improving behavioral outcomes after pediatric traumatic brain injury with increasing time since injury.

METHODS:

This was an individual participant data meta-analysis of outcome data from 5 randomized controlled trials of OFPST conducted between 2003 and 2016. We included 359 children ages 5 to 18 years who were hospitalized for moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury 1 to 24 months earlier. Outcomes, assessed pre- and posttreatment, included parent-reported measures of externalizing, internalizing, and executive function behaviors and social competence.

RESULTS:

Participants included 231 boys and 128 girls with an average age at injury of 13.6 years. Time since injury and age at injury moderated OFPST efficacy. For earlier ages and short time since injury, control participants demonstrated better externalizing problem scores than those receiving OFPST (Cohen's d = 0.44; P = .008; n = 295), whereas at older ages and longer time since injury, children receiving OFPST had better scores (Cohen's d = -0.60; P = .002). Children receiving OFPST were rated as having better executive functioning relative to control participants at a later age at injury, with greater effects seen at longer (Cohen's d = -0.66; P = .009; n = 298) than shorter (Cohen's d = -0. 28; P = .028) time since injury.

CONCLUSIONS:

OFPST may be more beneficial for older children and when begun after the initial months postinjury. With these findings, we shed light on the optimal application of family problem-solving treatments within the first 2 years after injury.

PMID:
30413559
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2018-0422

Conflict of interest statement

POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

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