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Urology. 2019 Feb;124:310.e9-310.e14. doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2018.06.061. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

The Effect of Calcium and Vitamin B6 Supplementation on Oxalate Excretion in a Rodent Gastric Bypass Model of Enteric Hyperoxaluria.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
2
Department of Urology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Electronic address: benjamin.canales@urology.ufl.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test the effect of calcium and vitamin B6 therapies on urinary oxalate excretion in a rodent model of enteric hyperoxaluria after Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery.

METHODS:

Obese male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham (n = 7) or RYGB (n = 10). Animals were maintained on low oxalate (1.5%) and fat (10%; LOF), normal calcium (0.6 %) diet for 8 weeks and then completed a 2-phase crossover metabolic study. In the first 2-week phase, animals were fed a Low oxalate and fat (LOF), high calcium (2.4%; HC) diet. After a 2-week washout, rats were fed a LOF/normal calcium diet highly enriched with vitamin B6. Urine was collected before and after each intervention. Plasma pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and metabolites were measured baseline and 11 weeks after sham or RYGB.

RESULTS:

Compared to baseline, sham animals on LOF/HC diet doubled their urinary calcium excretion but not oxalate. RYGB animals on LOF/HC diet decreased urinary oxalate excretion 28% (P = .001) without a significant rise in urinary calcium. Vitamin B6 supplementation decreased RYGB urinary oxalate by approximately 15% (P = .06), and serum PLP explained 63% of urinary oxalate variability.

CONCLUSION:

Based on the findings in this model, calcium supplementation appears to be a reasonable therapy to decrease urinary oxalate in RYGB patients who maintain a low fat and oxalate diet. Serum PLP had a fair correlation to urinary oxalate excretion and may be a useful screening tool in hyperoxaluric RYGB patients. Further experimental human studies after RYGB are necessary to determine whether these commonly employed supplements truly provide a benefit in enteric hyperoxaluria.

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PMID:
30412704
DOI:
10.1016/j.urology.2018.06.061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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