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Food Chem. 2019 Mar 15;276:619-625. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.10.065. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Gastric digestion of cow and goat milk: Peptides derived from simulated conditions of infant digestion.

Author information

1
Food & Bio-based Products Group, AgResearch Ruakura, 10 Bisley Road, Hamilton 3214, New Zealand. Electronic address: ali.hodgkinson@agresearch.co.nz.
2
Food & Bio-based Products Group, AgResearch Ruakura, 10 Bisley Road, Hamilton 3214, New Zealand. Electronic address: olivia.wallace@agresearch.co.nz.
3
Food & Bio-based Products Group, AgResearch Ruakura, 10 Bisley Road, Hamilton 3214, New Zealand. Electronic address: grant@ms3solutions.co.nz.
4
Dairy Goat Cooperative (NZ) Ltd, 18 Gallagher Drive, Hamilton 3206, New Zealand. Electronic address: colin.prosser@dgc.co.nz.

Abstract

Infant formula products are predominantly manufactured using cow milk protein; goat milk also provides a suitable protein source. In this study, we directly compared cow and goat milk protein digestion using pH and enzyme conditions to simulate infant gastric conditions. Generated peptides, identified using liquid chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer, show both similarities and differences in cow and goat milk post-digestion profiles. The majority of peptides were from casein proteins, 50% representing β-casein, with many peptides unique to each species. Low or no peptides for β-Lactoglobulin and α-Lactalbumin, respectively, suggest these proteins were highly resistant to infant gastric digestion, as reported by others. Minor milk proteins, comprising 5% of peptides, were represented by different proteins from cow and goat. Peptides with known bioactivities were also observed, both in common and unique to each species. Together these data may explain reported differences in digestion characteristics of cow and goat milk.

KEYWORDS:

Cow-milk; Goat-milk; Milk protein; Peptides; Simulated gastric digestion

PMID:
30409640
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.10.065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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