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Phys Ther Sport. 2019 Jan;35:18-22. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2018.10.011. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Epidemiology of injury in English Professional Football players: A cohort study.

Author information

1
Musculoskeletal Health Research Group, School of Clinical and Applied Science, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, LS13HE, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Ashley.D.Jones@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
2
Musculoskeletal Health Research Group, School of Clinical and Applied Science, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, LS13HE, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3HN, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the current incidence and location of injury in English professional football.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study conducted over one competitive season (2015/16).

SETTING:

Professional football players competing in the English Football League and National Conference.

PARTICIPANTS:

243 players from 10 squads (24.3 ± 4.21 per squad).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Injury incidence, training and match exposure were collected in accordance with the international consensus statement on football injury epidemiology.

RESULTS:

473 injuries were reported. The estimated incidence of injury was, 9.11 injuries/1000 h of football related activity. There was a higher incidence of injury during match play (24.29/1000 h) compared to training (6.84/1000 h). The thigh was the most common site of injury (31.7%), muscle strains accounted for 41.2% of all injuries. The hamstrings were the most frequently strained muscle group, accounting for 39.5% of all muscle strains and 16.3% of all injuries. Moderate severity injuries (8-28 days) were the most common (44.2%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Incidence of injury has increased over the last 16 years with muscle strains remaining the most prevalent injury. The hamstrings remain the most commonly injured muscle group.

KEYWORDS:

Audit; Epidemiology; Football; Injury; Muscle

PMID:
30408703
DOI:
10.1016/j.ptsp.2018.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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