Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Autoimmun Rev. 2019 Jan;18(1):93-106. doi: 10.1016/j.autrev.2018.08.003. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

Guidelines for biomarkers in autoimmune rheumatic diseases - evidence based analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Science, Rheumatology Unit, School of Medicine, University of L'Aquila, Delta 6 Building, Via dell'Ospedale, 67100 L'Aquila, Italy. Electronic address: roberto.giacomelli@cc.univaq.it.
2
Department of Medicine, Unit of Allergology, Immunology, Rheumatology, Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Via Álvaro del Portillo 21, 00128 Rome, Italy.
3
Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
4
Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Science, Rheumatology Unit, School of Medicine, University of L'Aquila, Delta 6 Building, Via dell'Ospedale, 67100 L'Aquila, Italy.
5
Centre for Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.
6
Department of Medical Science, Section of Rheumatology, University of Ferrara and Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria S.Anna, Cona, Ferrara, Italy.
7
IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Division of Rheumatology, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
8
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Rheumatology Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy.
9
Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
10
Department of Medicina dei Sistemi, Rheumatology, Allergology and Clinical Immunology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
11
Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Rheumatology Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
12
PhD Scholarship in Life Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, University of Catanzaro "Magna Graecia", Catanzaro, Italy.
13
Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Rheumatology Clinic, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria S. Maria della Misericordia, University of Udine, Udine, Italy.
14
Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
15
Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, DIMED, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
16
Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology of the Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
17
Rheumatology Research Group and Arthritis Research UK Rheumatoid Arthritis Pathogenesis Centre of Excellence (RACE), University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Trust, Birmingham, UK.
18
Immunorheumatology Research Laboratory, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy.
19
Dipartimento Biomedico di Medicina Interna e Specialistica, Rheumatology section, University of Palermo, Italy.
20
Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy.
21
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology (DIMO), Systemic Rheumatic and Autoimmune Diseases Unit, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, Italy.
22
Grant Office and Scientific Documentation Center, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy.
23
Zabludowitz Centre for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Centre, Tel-Hashomer, Israel.
24
Department of Health Sciences, University of Catanzaro "Magna Graecia", Catanzaro, Italy.
25
Department of Precision Medicine, University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Naples, Italy.
26
Villa San Giuseppe, Istituto S. Stefano, Como, Italy.
27
Pathophysiology Department, General Hospital of Athens "Laiko", Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.

Abstract

Autoimmune rheumatic diseases are characterised by an abnormal immune system response, complement activation, cytokines dysregulation and inflammation. In last years, despite many progresses in managing these patients, it has been shown that clinical remission is reached in less than 50% of patients and a personalised and tailored therapeutic approach is still lacking resulting in a significant gap between guidelines and real-world practice. In this context, the need for biomarkers facilitating early diagnosis and profiling those individuals at the highest risk for a poor outcome has become of crucial interest. A biomarker generally refers to a measured characteristic which may be used as an indicator of some biological state or condition. Three different types of medical biomarkers has been suggested: i. mechanistic markers; ii. clinical disease markers; iii. therapeutic markers. A combination of biomarkers from these different groups could be used for an ideal more accurate diagnosis and treatment. However, although a growing body of evidence is focused on improving biomarkers, a significant amount of this information is not integrated on standard clinical care. The overarching aim of this work was to clarify the meaning of specific biomarkers during autoimmune diseases; their possible role in confirming diagnosis, predicting outcome and suggesting specific treatments.

KEYWORDS:

Antiphospholipid syndrome; Biomarker; Rheumatoid arthritis; Sjögren syndrome; Spondyloarthritides; Systemic lupus erythematosus; Systemic sclerosis

PMID:
30408582
DOI:
10.1016/j.autrev.2018.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center