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Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2018 Dec;156:103-116. doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2018.11.002. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

Chemogenetic inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, individually and concurrently, impairs object recognition and spatial memory consolidation in female mice.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211, United States.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211, United States. Electronic address: frickk@uwm.edu.

Abstract

The dorsal hippocampus (DH) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are brain regions essential for processing and storing episodic memory. In rodents, the DH has a well-established role in supporting the consolidation of episodic-like memory in tasks such as object recognition and object placement. However, the role of the mPFC in the consolidation of episodic-like memory tasks remains controversial. Therefore, the present study examined involvement of the DH and mPFC, alone and in combination, in object and spatial recognition memory consolidation in ovariectomized female mice. To this end, we utilized two types of inhibitory Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) to inactivate the DH alone, the mPFC alone, or both brain regions concurrently immediately after object training to assess the role of each region in the consolidation of object recognition and spatial memories. Our results using single and multiplexed DREADDS suggest that excitatory activity in the DH and mPFC, alone or in combination, is required for the successful consolidation of object recognition and spatial memories. Together, these studies provide critical insight into how the DH and mPFC work in concert to facilitate memory consolidation in female mice.

KEYWORDS:

CNO; DREADD; Hippocampus; Memory; Object placement; SALB

PMID:
30408525
DOI:
10.1016/j.nlm.2018.11.002
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