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Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2019 Jan 1;49(1):77-86. doi: 10.1093/jjco/hyy158.

Cigarette smoking and cervical cancer risk: an evaluation based on a systematic review and meta-analysis among Japanese women.

Author information

1
Department of Health Informatics and Public Health, Division of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University School of Public Health, Sendai, Japan.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Center for Clinical Sciences, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
6
Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan.
7
Department of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
8
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.
9
Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Division of Environmental Medicine and Population Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Japan.
10
Department of Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan.
11
Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.
12
Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Faculty of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.

Abstract

Background:

There is a body of evidence to suggest that cigarette smoking increases the risk of cervical cancer in women, but no study has examined the magnitude of the association in Japanese women. Here, we evaluated the association between cigarette smoking and the risk of cervical cancer in Japanese women based on a systematic review of epidemiological evidence.

Methods:

Original data were obtained from a MEDLINE search using PubMed or from a search of the 'Ichushi' database, as well as by a manual search. Evaluation of associations was based on the strength of evidence and the magnitude of association, together with biological plausibility as evaluated previously by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Meta-analysis of associations was also conducted to obtain a summarized overview of the data.

Results:

We identified two cohort studies and three case-control studies. All five studies had indicated strong positive associations between cigarette smoking and the risk of cervical cancer. Our summary estimate indicated that the relative risk (RR) for individuals who had ever-smoked relative to never-smokers was 2.03 (95% confidence interval: 1.49-2.57). Four studies had also demonstrated dose-response relationships between cigarette smoking and the risk of cervical cancer.

Conclusion:

We conclude that there is convincing evidence that cigarette smoking increases the risk of cervical cancer among Japanese women.

PMID:
30407555
DOI:
10.1093/jjco/hyy158

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