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Pediatr Surg Int. 2018 Nov 8. doi: 10.1007/s00383-018-4373-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Isolation and characterisation of mouse intestinal mesoangioblasts.

Author information

1
Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London, WC1N 1EH, UK.
2
Specialist Neonatal and Paediatric Surgery (SNAPS) Department, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
3
Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London, WC1N 1EH, UK. n.thapar@ucl.ac.uk.
4
Neurogastroenterology and Motility Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. n.thapar@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

Children suffering from intestinal failure (IF) endure considerable morbidity and overall have poor survival rates, complicated by the shortage of organs available for transplantation. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are pivotal if outcomes are to be improved. Over the past years, tissue engineering (TE) has emerged as a possible alternative treatment for many congenital and acquired conditions. TE aims at creating bioengineered organs by means of combining scaffolds with appropriate cell types, which in the intestine are organised within a multilayer structure. In order to generate functional intestine, this cellular diversity and organisation will need to be recreated. While the cells for the epithelial, neural and vascular compartments have been well defined, so far, less attention has been put on the muscular compartment. More recently, mesoangioblasts (MABs) have been identified as a novel source for tissue regeneration since they are able to give rise to vascular and other mesodermal derivatives. To date MABs have not been successfully isolated from intestinal tissue. Therefore, our aim was to demonstrate the possibility of isolating MABs from adult mouse small intestine.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

All experiments were carried out using small intestinal tissues from C57BL/6J mice. We applied an established protocol for MAB isolation from the isolated neuromuscular layer of the small intestine. Cultured cells were stained for Ki67 to assess proliferation rates as well as for a panel of pericyte markers to determine their phenotype.

RESULTS:

Cells were successfully isolated from gut biopsies. Cultured cells showed good proliferative capacity and positivity for at least three pericytes markers found in vessels of the gut neuromuscular wall: neuron-glial antigen 2, alkaline phosphatase and platelet-derived growth factor β.

CONCLUSION:

This proof-of-principle study lays the foundation for further characterization of MABs as a possible cell source for intestinal smooth muscle regeneration and TE.

KEYWORDS:

Mesoangioblasts; Regenerative medicine; Small intestine; Smooth muscle cells; Tissue engineering

PMID:
30406837
DOI:
10.1007/s00383-018-4373-7

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