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Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018 Nov;99(5):1342-1345. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0836.

Measles and Rubella Seroprevalence in Mother-Infant Pairs in Rural Nepal and the United States: Pre- and Post-Elimination Populations.

Author information

1
George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
3
Department of Global Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia.
4
Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
5
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Nepal Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu.
6
Nepal Nutrition Intervention Project-Sarlahi (NNIPS), Kathmandu, Nepal.
7
Children's Core for Biomedical Statistics, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington.
8
Global Health Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
9
Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Abstract

We sought to compare seroprevalence of protective measles and rubella-specific antibody in mother-infant pairs across two populations: a pre-disease elimination Nepal population with recently introduced rubella vaccine and post-disease elimination U.S. population. Qualitative measles and rubella immunoglobulin G was assessed in maternal serum and cord blood from 258 pairs in Nepal, 2012-2013 and 49 pairs in Seattle, WA, 2014-2015. High rates of protective antibody were observed in both populations. Two hundred and forty-four (95%) pregnant women in Nepal had protective measles antibody versus 44 (92%) in Seattle (P = 0.42). Ninety-six percent of infants in Nepal (N = 246) and Seattle (N = 43) had protective measles antibody (P = 0.75). Ninety-four percentage of pregnant women in Nepal (N = 242) and Seattle (N = 45) had protective rubella antibody (P = 0.23). Two hundred and thirty-eight (93%) infants in Nepal had protective rubella antibody versus 44 (98%) in Seattle (P = 0.12). Continued surveillance will be necessary to ensure protective immunity, inform progress toward disease elimination in Nepal and avoid reemergence in the United States.

PMID:
30403166
PMCID:
PMC6221218
DOI:
10.4269/ajtmh.17-0836
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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