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Br J Cancer. 2018 Oct;119(9):1144-1154. doi: 10.1038/s41416-018-0211-x. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Metabolite and lipoprotein responses and prediction of weight gain during breast cancer treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 8905 MTFS, Trondheim, 7491, Norway.
2
Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, 0424, Norway.
3
Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 9037, Norway.
4
Department of Oncology, St. Olavs University Hospital, P.O. Box 3250 Sluppen, Trondheim, 7006, Norway.
5
Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 8905 MTFS, Trondheim, 7491, Norway.
6
Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, 7491, Norway.
7
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, St. Olav University Hospital of Trondheim, P.O. Box 3250 Sluppen, Trondheim, 7006, Norway.
8
Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4953 Nydalen, Oslo, 0424, Norway.
9
Bruker BioSpin GmbH, Application Method Development Group, Silberstreifen, 76287, Rheinstetten, Germany.
10
Department of Surgery, St. Olavs University Hospital, P.O. Box 3250 Sluppen, Trondheim, 7006, Norway.
11
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O Box 1171 Blindern, Oslo, 0318, Norway.
12
Division of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway.
13
Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4953 Nydalen, Oslo, 0424, Norway.
14
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 8905 MTFS, Trondheim, 7491, Norway. guro.giskeodegard@ntnu.no.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Breast cancer treatment has metabolic side effects, potentially affecting risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and recurrence. We aimed to compare alterations in serum metabolites and lipoproteins during treatment between recipients and non-recipients of chemotherapy, and describe metabolite profiles associated with treatment-related weight gain.

METHODS:

This pilot study includes 60 stage I/II breast cancer patients who underwent surgery and were treated according to national guidelines. Serum sampled pre-surgery and after 6 and 12 months was analysed by MR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In all, 170 metabolites and 105 lipoprotein subfractions were quantified.

RESULTS:

The metabolite and lipoprotein profiles of chemotherapy recipients and non-recipients changed significantly 6 months after surgery (p < 0.001). Kynurenine, the lipid signal at 1.55-1.60 ppm, ADMA, 2 phosphatidylcholines (PC aa C38:3, PC ae C42:1), alpha-aminoadipic acid, hexoses and sphingolipids were increased in chemotherapy recipients after 6 months. VLDL and small dense LDL increased after 6 months, while HDL decreased, with triglyceride enrichment in HDL and LDL. At baseline, weight gainers had less acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, lyso-phosphatidylcholines and sphingolipids, and showed an inflammatory lipid profile.

CONCLUSION:

Chemotherapy recipients exhibit metabolic changes associated with inflammation, altered immune response and increased risk of CVD. Altered lipid metabolism may predispose for treatment-related weight gain.

PMID:
30401977
DOI:
10.1038/s41416-018-0211-x

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