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Hosp Pediatr. 2018 Dec;8(12):761-768. doi: 10.1542/hpeds.2018-0116. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

The Joys and Frustrations of Breastfeeding and Rooming-In Among Mothers With Opioid Use Disorder: A Qualitative Study.

Author information

1
Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; mbhoward@bu.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; and.
3
Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate perspectives of mothers with opioid use disorder regarding breastfeeding and rooming-in during the birth hospitalization and identify facilitators and barriers.

METHODS:

We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 25 mothers with opioid use disorder 1-12 weeks after delivery. Grounded theory analysis was used until thematic saturation was reached. Findings were triangulated, with experts in the field and a subset of informants themselves, to ensure data reliability.

RESULTS:

Among 25 infant-mother dyads, 36% of infants required pharmacologic treatment, 72% of mothers initiated breastfeeding, and 40% continued until discharge. We identified the following themes: (1) information drives maternal feeding choice; (2) the hospital environment is both a source of support and tension for mothers exerting autonomy in the care of their infants; (3) opioid withdrawal symptoms negatively impact breastfeeding; (4) internal and external stigma negatively impact mothers' self-efficacy; (5) mothers' histories of abuse and trauma affect their feeding choice and bonding; (6) mothers' recovery makes caring for their infants emotionally and logistically challenging; and (7) having an infant is a source of resilience and provides a sense of purpose for mothers on their path of recovery.

CONCLUSIONS:

Future interventions aimed at increasing breastfeeding and rooming-in during the birth hospitalization should focus on education regarding the benefits of breastfeeding and rooming-in, supporting mothers' autonomy in caring for their infants, minimizing stigma, and maximizing resilience.

PMID:
30401783
DOI:
10.1542/hpeds.2018-0116

Conflict of interest statement

POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

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