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Prim Care. 2018 Dec;45(4):731-742. doi: 10.1016/j.pop.2018.08.002. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Medication-Assisted Treatment Considerations for Women with Opiate Addiction Disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont, 235 Rowell, 106 Carrigan Drive, Burlington, VT 05405, USA. Electronic address: Alicia.Jacobs@UVMHealth.org.
2
Department of Family Medicine, the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont, 235 Rowell, 106 Carrigan Drive, Burlington, VT 05405, USA.

Abstract

Opioid addiction rates are at a national high, with significant morbidity and mortality. In women, rates have been steadily increasing to be at par with addiction rates in men. Women tend to have quicker addiction and shorter duration to adverse outcomes. Treatment of women has the best outcomes when it is gender-specific, trauma-informed, connected with access to psychiatric services, and integrated into the medical home. Improved outcomes can be achieved with coordinated systems of care based on the harm-reduction model, with integration of medication-assisted therapy in a patient-centered medical home.

KEYWORDS:

Buprenorphine; Harm reduction; Hub-and-spoke model; Medication-assisted therapy (MAT); Opioid addiction; Opioid-use disorder (OUD); Trauma-informed care

PMID:
30401353
DOI:
10.1016/j.pop.2018.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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