Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2018 Oct 30;231:204-209. doi: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2018.10.051. [Epub ahead of print]

Religious attitudes to gamete donation.

Author information

1
Homerton Fertility Centre, Homerton University NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: royhomburg@gmail.com.
2
Homerton Fertility Centre, Homerton University NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: husainfatima@hotmail.com.
3
Homerton Fertility Centre, Homerton University NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: anilgudi@gmail.com.
4
Homerton Fertility Centre, Homerton University NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: brincatm@maltanet.net.
5
Homerton Fertility Centre, Homerton University NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: amit.shah@nhs.net.

Abstract

Religious teachings encourage fertility. The rapid progress of reproductive science has proved a challenge to interpret and adapt to assisted reproductive techniques which were not even dreamed of in ancient scriptures. The clash between religion and science has produced separate laws for each religion and reproductive practitioners are often at a loss to understand and accept them. Four lay members of different religions have set out the thinking of their religion regarding assisted reproductive techniques, concentrating in particular on gamete donation. Similarities rather than differences seem to dominate in the attitudes of the orthodox Catholic, Hindu, Jewish and Muslim beliefs and doctrines. The knowledge of these various religious beliefs and attitudes, as well as promoting a greater understanding, should help reproductive practitioners to accept and abide by the religious wishes of their patients.

KEYWORDS:

Gamete donation; IVF; Patient preferences

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center