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Sci Adv. 2018 Oct 24;4(10):eaat2166. doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aat2166. eCollection 2018 Oct.

Uncovering the psychoactivity of a cannabinoid from liverworts associated with a legal high.

Author information

1
Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, NCCR TransCure, University of Bern, Bühlstrasse 28, 3012 Bern, Switzerland.
2
Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 3, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Phytochemical studies on the liverwort Radula genus have previously identified the bibenzyl (-)-cis-perrottetinene (cis-PET), which structurally resembles (-)-Δ9-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-trans-THC) from Cannabis sativa L. Radula preparations are sold as cannabinoid-like legal high on the internet, even though pharmacological data are lacking. Herein, we describe a versatile total synthesis of (-)-cis-PET and its (-)-trans diastereoisomer and demonstrate that both molecules readily penetrate the brain and induce hypothermia, catalepsy, hypolocomotion, and analgesia in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner in mice. The natural product (-)-cis-PET was profiled on major brain receptors, showing a selective cannabinoid pharmacology. This study also uncovers pharmacological differences between Δ9-THC and PET diastereoisomers. Most notably, (-)-cis-PET and (-)-trans-PET significantly reduced basal brain prostaglandin levels associated with Δ9-trans-THC side effects in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner, thus mimicking the action of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol. Therefore, the natural product (-)-cis-PET is a psychoactive cannabinoid from bryophytes, illustrating the existence of convergent evolution of bioactive cannabinoids in the plant kingdom. Our findings may have implications for bioprospecting and drug discovery and provide a molecular rationale for the reported effects upon consumption of certain Radula preparations as moderately active legal highs.

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