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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Nov 5. doi: 10.1038/s41430-018-0350-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Longitudinal effect of 20-year infancy-onset dietary intervention on food consumption and nutrient intake: the randomized controlled STRIP study.

Author information

1
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
2
Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
3
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
4
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland.
5
Department of Medicine, University of Turku and Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
6
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
7
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. katja.pahkala@utu.fi.
8
Paavo Nurmi Centre, Sports & Exercise Medicine Unit, Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. katja.pahkala@utu.fi.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Coronary heart disease begins in childhood and warrants prevention strategies such as dietary modification. The objective was to determine the effect of the Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP) dietary intervention on food consumption and nutrient intake over 20-year intervention period.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

The STRIP is a prospective, randomized trial conducted between 1990 and 2011. Enrolled 6-month-old infants (n = 1062) were randomized to an intervention group (n = 540) receiving dietary counseling biannually from age 7 months to 20 years or control group (n = 522) not receiving any intervention. Food and nutrient intake was assessed annually using 4-day food records. A food-based diet score was calculated.

RESULTS:

The intervention led to (1) higher consumption of low-fat unsweetened dairy (β = 177.76, 95% CI 157.36-198.16 g/day), vegetable-oil based fats (β = 6.00, 5.37-6.63 g/day), fish (β = 2.45, 1.44-3.45 g/day), fiber-rich grain products (β = 5.53, 3.17-7.89 g/day), fruits/berries (β = 9.93, 4.44-15.43 g/day), vegetables (β = 11.95, 7.74-16.16 g/day); (2) lower consumption of desserts (β = - 4.10, 95% CI - 6.50 to - 1.70 g/day); (3) lower intake of sucrose (β = - 1.61, 95% CI - 2.88 to - 0.35 g/day), and higher intake of fiber (β = 0.83, 0.55-1.11 g/day), folate (β = 11.14, 95% CI 8.23-14.05 μg/day), vitamin D (β = 0.52, 0.39-0.64 μg/day), C (β = 8.08, 4.79-11.38 mg/day), E (β = 0.93, 0.81-1.05 mg/day), iron (β = 0.31, 0.18-0.44 mg/day), zinc (β = 0.29, 0.17-0.40 mg/day), magnesium (β = 12.17, 9.02-15.33 mg/day), sodium (β = 55.00, 24.40-85.60 mg/day), potassium (β = 157.11, 107.24-206.98 mg/day). No effect was found on nut/seed, red/processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverage, salty snack consumption, or vitamin A and calcium intake. Intervention effect was more pronounced in boys.

CONCLUSIONS:

The STRIP intervention improved children's diet quality over 20 years, indicating that beneficial dietary changes can be introduced and sustained in youth.

PMID:
30397257
DOI:
10.1038/s41430-018-0350-4

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