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Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am. 2019 Jan;29(1):15-25. doi: 10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.002. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Diabetic Gastroparesis and Nondiabetic Gastroparesis.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, 321 Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210008, China.
2
Division of Digestive Diseases, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.
3
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 160 Pujian Road, Shanghai 200127, China.
4
Division of Digestive Diseases, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address: qcai@emory.edu.

Abstract

Gastroparesis can be divided into diabetic and nondiabetic, and the 3 main causes of gastroparesis are diabetic, postsurgical, and idiopathic. Delayed gastric emptying is the main manifestation of motility disorders for gastroparesis. Symptoms of gastroparesis are nonspecific and severity can vary. Nausea and vomiting are more common in diabetic gastroparesis whereas abdominal pain and early satiety are more frequent in idiopathic gastroparesis. Medication is still the mainstay of treatment of gastroparesis; however, the development of gastric electric stimulation and gastric peroral endoscopic pyloromyotomy brings more options for the treatment of diabetic and nondiabetic gastroparesis.

KEYWORDS:

Etiology; Gastric peroral endoscopic pyloromyotomy (G-POEM); Gastroparesis; Peroral endoscopic pyloromyotomy (POP)

PMID:
30396524
DOI:
10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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