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Acad Pediatr. 2018 Nov 2. pii: S1876-2859(18)30749-6. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2018.11.003. [Epub ahead of print]

Burnout in Pediatric Residents: Comparing Brief Screening Questions to the Maslach Burnout Inventory.

Author information

1
Ohio State University in Columbus, OH. Electronic address: kathi.kemper@osumc.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, Pittsburgh Children's Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA.
3
University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago and the data analyst for the Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD) Longitudinal Educational Assessment Research Network (LEARN).
4
Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio.
5
Seattle Children's Hospital and the University of Washington in Seattle, WA.
6
Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC.
7
University of Arizona and Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona in Tucson, AZ.
8
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, OH.
9
Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Measuring burnout symptoms is important, but the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) has 22 items. This project compared three single items with the MBI and other factors related to burnout.

METHODS:

Data were analyzed from the 2016 and 2017 Pediatric Resident Burnout-Resilience Study Consortium surveys which included standard measures of perceived stress, mindfulness, self-compassion, and resilience, the MBI, and the 1- and 2-item screening questions.

RESULTS:

In 2016 and 2017, data were collected from 1785/2723 (65%) and 2148/3273 (66%) eligible pediatric residents respectively. Burnout rates on the MBI were 56% in 2016 and 54% in 2017. The Physicians' Work Life Study (PWLS) item generated estimates of burnout prevalence of 43%-49%, and compared with the MBI for 2016 and 2017, had sensitivities of 69 -72%, specificities of 79%-82%, positive likelihood ratios (LR+) of 3.4-3.8 and negative likelihood ratios (LR-) of 0.35-0.38. The combination of an Emotional Exhaustion (EE) item and a depersonalization (DP) item generated burnout estimates of 53% in both years, and compared with the full MBI, had sensitivities of 85%-87%, specificities of 84%-85%, LR+ of 5.7-6.4 and LR- of 0.18 in both years; both items were significantly correlated with their parent subscales. The single items were significantly correlated with stress, mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion.

DISCUSSION:

The 1- and 2-item screens generated prevalence estimates similar to the MBI and were correlated with variables associated with burnout. The 1- and 2-item screens may be useful for pediatric residency training programs tracking burnout symptoms and response to interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Burnout; Education; Pediatric; Resident; Resilience; Screening

PMID:
30395934
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2018.11.003

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