Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Adolesc Health. 2019 Mar;64(3):340-346. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.08.029. Epub 2018 Nov 2.

The Profundity of the Everyday: Family Routines in Adolescence Predict Development in Young Adulthood.

Author information

1
Center for Family Research, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. Electronic address: awbarton@uga.edu.
2
Center for Family Research, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia.
3
Center for Family Research, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; Department of Human Development and Family, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia.
4
Department of Psychology, Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.
5
Center for Family Research, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The current study was designed to investigate the unique, long-term effects of family routines during adolescence on multiple developmental domains in young adulthood for rural African-Americans.

METHODS:

Prospective data were collected annually for 6 years from 504 rural African-American youth and their parents, beginning when the youth were 16 years of age.

RESULTS:

Results indicated that youth whose primary caregivers reported more family routines during adolescence (e.g., regularly eating together as a family, consistent bedtime) reported less alcohol use, greater emotional self-regulation, lower epinephrine levels, and higher rates of college/university enrollment in young adulthood. These effects were evident for all outcomes controlling for socioeconomic risk, sex, and available baseline (age 16 years) measures; for a subset of outcomes, the effects of family routines persisted even after taking into account levels of supportive parenting, harsh parenting, and household chaos.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings substantiate the benefits of consistent, predictable family environments for healthy development and suggest that family routines constitute an important, yet understudied, factor for adolescents' long-term development.

KEYWORDS:

African-American; Alcohol use; Education; Epinephrine; Family; Routines; Self-regulation

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center