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Arthroscopy. 2018 Nov;34(11):3033-3042. doi: 10.1016/j.arthro.2018.05.039.

Topographic Matching of Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation Using Lateral Femoral Condyle for the Treatment of Medial Femoral Condyle Lesions: A Computer-Simulated Model Study.

Author information

1
Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
2
Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A.
3
Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
4
Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.. Electronic address: basworth@mac.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to determine whether lateral femoral condyle (LFC) osteochondral allografts (OCAs) would have a similar articular cartilage contour and resulting subchondral bone contour when compared with medial femoral condyle (MFC) allografts for the treatment of MFC chondral defects.

METHODS:

In this controlled laboratory study, human femoral hemi-condyles (10 MFCs and 8 LFCs) were divided into 4 groups: MFC recipient, MFC donor, ipsilateral LFC donor, and contralateral LFC donor. Computed tomography (CT) images were obtained for each, and 3D CT models were created and exported into point-cloud models. Three circular defect and graft models were created on each condyle at 3 locations (0°, 45° posterior, and 90° posterior regions). The graft model in each donor group was virtually placed on the MFC recipient defect model. The least distances of the articular cartilage surface between the graft and the defect models and the resulting mean least distance of the subchondral bone surface were calculated.

RESULTS:

The mean least distance of the articular cartilage surface was less than 0.5 mm in all donor-recipients, and there was no significant difference among donor groups. Although the mean least distance of the subchondral bone surface was significantly greater than the articular cartilage surface in all donor groups (P < .001), there was no significant difference among donor groups.

CONCLUSION:

Ipsilateral and contralateral LFC grafts provided similar articular cartilage surface and resulting subchondral bone surface matching with that of MFC grafts, suggesting that LFCs could be a potential source of OCA for the treatment of MFC lesions.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Ipsilateral and contralateral LFCs can be suitable donor sites for the treatment of MFC lesions with OCAs.

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