Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Res. 2019 Jan;168:448-459. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2018.10.008. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Association between ambient air pollution and Parkinson's disease: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, 81# Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, China.
2
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, Fudan University, 138# Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032, China.
3
Lu'an City Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Middle Road of Gao Cheng, Lu'an 237000, China.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, 81# Meishan Road, Hefei 230032, China. Electronic address: zhangxiujun@ahmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Air pollution has been evaluated as a possible risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), but, the present results are inconsistent and have not been combined. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and PD, given the nature of disease etiology. A total of 10 studies were identified by searching Web of Science, Science Direct, and PubMed before October 2017. We found a significantly increased risk of PD with 10 parts per billion (ppb) increase in nitrogen oxides (NOx) exposure (relative risk (RR) = 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.09). The pooled RR for the association between carbon monoxide (CO) exposure, 1 parts per million (ppm) increment, and the risk of PD was 1.65 (95% CI: 1.10, 2.48). The pooled RRs for the association between nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) exposure per 1 ppb increment, and the risk of PD were 1.01 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.03) and 1.01 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.02), respectively. There was a significant heterogeneity in the meta-analysis for fine particulate matter (PM2.5), NO2, sulfur dioxide (SO2), and CO. We concluded that NO2, NOx, CO and O3 exposure were associated with an increased risk of PD, although there is high risk of bias. The dose-response effects evaluated by high-quality studies are needed. Researches should be expanded to low- and/or middle- income countries where indoor and outdoor air pollution are high. CAPSULE: Long-term exposure to ambient NO2, NOx, CO and O3 can increase the risk of Parkinson's disease.

KEYWORDS:

Ambient air pollution; Meta-analysis; Parkinson's disease; Systematic review

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center