Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2019 May;100(5):874-882. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2018.10.008. Epub 2018 Nov 2.

Residual Disability, Mortality, and Nursing Home Placement After Hip Fracture Over 2 Decades.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Institute of Gerontology, University of Georgia College of Public Health, Athens, GA.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
4
University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: jmagazin@som.umaryland.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine trends in 12-month postfracture residual disability, nursing home placement, and mortality among patients with a hip fracture between 1990 and 2011.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of 12-month outcomes from 3 cohort studies and control arms of 2 randomized controlled trials.

SETTING:

Original studies were conducted as part of the Baltimore Hip Studies (BHS).

PARTICIPANTS:

Community-dwelling patients ≥65 years of age hospitalized for surgical repair of a nonpathologic hip fracture (N=988).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Twelve-month residual disability, mortality, and nursing home residency were examined in case-mix adjusted models by sex and study. Residual disability was calculated by subtracting prefracture scores of Lower Extremity Physical Activities of Daily Living from scores at 12 months postfracture. We also examined the proportion of individuals with a 12-month score higher than their prefracture score (residual disability>0).

RESULTS:

Only small improvements were seen in residual disability between 1990 and 2011. No significant differences were seen for men between BHS2 (enrollment 1990-1991; mean residual disability=3.1 activities; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.16-4.10) and BHS7 (enrollment 2006-2011; mean=3.1 activities; 95% CI, 2.41-3.82). In women, residual disability significantly improved from BHS2 (mean=3.5 activities; 95% CI, 2.95-3.99) to BHS3 (enrollment 1992-1995; mean=2.7 activities; 95% CI, 2.01-3.30) with no significant improvements in later studies. After adjustment, a substantial proportion (91% of men and 79% of women) had a negative outcome (residual disability, died, or nursing home residence at 12 months) in the most recently completed study (BHS7).

CONCLUSIONS:

Over 2 decades, patients undergoing usual care post-hip fracture still had substantial residual disability. Additional clinical and research efforts are needed to determine how to improve hip fracture treatment, rehabilitation, and subsequent outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Disability evaluation; Hip fractures; Outcome assessment (health care); Rehabilitation

PMID:
30391413
PMCID:
PMC6487218
[Available on 2020-05-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2018.10.008

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center