Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Anesthesiol Clin. 2018 Dec;36(4):567-580. doi: 10.1016/j.anclin.2018.07.013.

Surgical Prehabilitation: Nutrition and Exercise.

Author information

1
Anesthesiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke University Health System, 5th Floor HAFS, DUMC 3094, 2301 Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27710, USA; Perioperative Medicine, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: john.whittle@duke.edu.
2
Nutrition Support Service, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Hospital, Duke University School of Medicine, 2400 Pratt Street, Durham, NC 27705, USA.
3
Critical Care Research Group, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, University Road, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
4
Duke University School of Medicine, Duke University Health System, 5th Floor HAFS, DUMC 3094, 2301 Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Abstract

Complications after major surgery account for a disproportionate amount of in-hospital morbidity and mortality. Recent efforts have focused on preoperative optimization in an attempt to modify the risk associated with major surgery. Underaddressed, but important, modifiable risk factors are physical fitness and nutritional status. Surgical patients are particularly at risk of 3 related, but distinct, conditions: frailty, sarcopenia, and reduced physical fitness. Exercise-based prehabilitation strategies have shown promise in terms of improving aerobic fitness, although their impact on key clinical perioperative outcome measures have not been fully determined. Preoperative nutritional status also has a strong bearing on perioperative outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Nutrition; Perioperative medicine; Prehabilitation; Preoptimization

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center