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Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2019 Jan;99:257-264. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2018.10.021. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Associations of cord blood leptin and adiponectin with children's cognitive abilities.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Brown University, Providence, RI, United States. Electronic address: nan_li1@brown.edu.
2
Population Studies Division, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
3
School of Psychology, Laval University, Ville de Québec, Québec, Canada.
4
Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Canada; Child and Family Research Institute, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
5
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States.
6
Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, IWK Health Center, Halifax, Canada.
7
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine Research Center, Mother and Child University Hospital Center, Montreal, Québec, Canada; Centre de recherche du CHUS (CHU de Sherbrooke), University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.
8
CHU de Québec-Université Laval Research Center, Ville de Québec, Québec, Canada.
9
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine Research Center, Mother and Child University Hospital Center, Montreal, Québec, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
10
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Division of General and Community Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States.
12
Department of Epidemiology, Brown University, Providence, RI, United States.

Abstract

Background Adipocytokines may play a role in fetal programming of neurodevelopment. We aimed to investigate the associations between cord blood adipocytokine concentrations and children's intelligence test scores. Methods We used data from two ongoing pregnancy cohorts in North America: the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC, n = 429) and Health Outcomes and Measures of the Environment (HOME, n = 183) Studies. Umbilical cord blood adipocytokine concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We assessed children's Intelligence Quotient (IQ) and its components using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scales of Intelligence-III or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV. We used linear regression and linear mixed models to estimate associations between log2-transformed adipocytokine concentrations and children's IQ after adjusting for sociodemographic, perinatal, and child factors. Results After adjusting for covariates, cord blood adiponectin was positively associated with children's full-scale IQ scores at age 3 years in the MIREC Study (β = 1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2, 2.5) and at ages 5 and 8 years in the HOME Study (β = 1.7, CI: -0.1, 3.5). Adiponectin was positively associated with performance IQ in both studies (MIREC: β = 2.0, CI: 0.7, 3.3; HOME: β = 2.2, CI: 0.5, 3.9). Adiponectin was positively associated with working memory composite scores at age 8 in the HOME Study (β = 3.1, CI: 1.0, 5.2). Leptin was not associated with children's IQ in either study. Conclusions Cord blood adiponectin was associated with higher full-scale and performance IQ and working memory composite scores in children. Future studies are needed to explore the mechanisms underlying these associations.

KEYWORDS:

Adipocytokines; Children; Cognitive abilities; Intelligence quotient

PMID:
30390444
PMCID:
PMC6239208
[Available on 2020-01-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.psyneuen.2018.10.021

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