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Sci Rep. 2018 Nov 1;8(1):16199. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-34530-4.

Protective effect of pre- and post-vitamin C treatments on UVB-irradiation-induced skin damage.

Author information

1
Molecular Regulation of Aging, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, 173-0015, Japan.
2
Department of Life Science and Bioethics, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, 113-8510, Japan.
3
Department of Biomolecular Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, Chiba, 274-8510, Japan.
4
Department of Bioenvironmental Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokuriku University, Ishikawa, 920-1181, Japan.
5
Risou Co., Ltd, Tokyo, 104-0061, Japan.
6
Molecular Regulation of Aging, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, 173-0015, Japan. ishigami@tmig.or.jp.

Abstract

Several studies have reported the effects of vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid, AA) on ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced cell damage using cultured keratinocytes. However, the epidermis consists of multiple cell layers, and the effect of AA on UVB-induced damage to the human epidermis remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effect of AA on UVB-induced skin damage using reconstituted human epidermis. The reconstituted human epidermal surface was treated with 100 and 500 mM AA and cultured for 3 h before (pre-AA treatment) or after (post-AA treatment) 120 mJ/cm2 UVB irradiation. Pre- and post-AA treatments of the epidermal surface suppressed UVB-induced cell death, apoptosis, DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the inflammatory response by downregulating tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression and release. Moreover, the pre-AA treatment was more effective at preventing UVB-induced skin damage than the post-AA treatment. In summary, pre- and post-AA treatments of the epidermis prevent UVB-induced damage.

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