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Nat Commun. 2018 Nov 1;9(1):4573. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-06914-7.

Microfluidic-spinning construction of black-phosphorus-hybrid microfibres for non-woven fabrics toward a high energy density flexible supercapacitor.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals and Functional Polymer Materials, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, 210009, PR China.
2
i-Lab, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, 215123, PR China.
3
Institute of Industry and Equipment Technology, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, 230009, Anhui, PR China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals and Functional Polymer Materials, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, 210009, PR China. gwu2016@njtech.edu.cn.
5
i-Lab, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, 215123, PR China. kzhang2015@sinano.ac.cn.
6
State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals and Functional Polymer Materials, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, 210009, PR China. chensu@njtech.edu.cn.

Abstract

Flexible supercapacitors have recently attracted intense interest. However, achieving high energy density via practical materials and synthetic techniques is a major challenge. Here, we develop a hetero-structured material made of black phosphorous that is chemically bridged with carbon nanotubes. Using a microfluidic-spinning technique, the hybrid black phosphorous-carbon nanotubes are further assembled into non-woven fibre fabrics that deliver high performance as supercapacitor electrodes. The flexible supercapacitor exhibits high energy density (96.5 mW h cm-3), large volumetric capacitance (308.7 F cm-3), long cycle stability and durability upon deformation. The key to performance lies in the open two-dimensional structure of the black phosphorous/carbon nanotubes, plentiful channels (pores <1 nm), enhanced conduction, and mechanical stability as well as fast ion transport and ion flooding. Benefiting from this design, high-energy flexible supercapacitors can power various electronics (e.g., light emitting diodes, smart watches and displays). Such designs may guide the development of next-generation wearable electronics.

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