Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Res. 2019 Jan;168:375-381. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.018. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and incident pregnancy loss: The LIFE Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Office of Director, and Bioinformatics Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
2
Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
3
Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
4
Office of Director, and Bioinformatics Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; Dean's Office, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA.
5
Office of Director, and Bioinformatics Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: melissa.smarr@emory.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have not been studied in relation to incident pregnancy loss in human populations, despite their ubiquitous exposure and purported reproductive toxicity.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the association between preconception serum PBDE concentrations and incident pregnancy loss.

METHODS:

A preconception cohort of 501 couples was followed while trying to become pregnant, and for whom serum concentrations of 10 PBDE congeners were measured using gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. Pregnancy was prospectively identified as a positive home pregnancy test on the day of expected menstruation. Incident pregnancy loss was defined for 344 singleton pregnancies as a conversion to a negative home pregnancy test, menses, or clinical diagnosis depending upon gestational age. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for individual and summed PBDEs and incident pregnancy loss, adjusting for relevant covariates and male partners' information. In sensitivity analyses, inverse probability weighting was used to account for couples not becoming pregnant and, thereby, not at risk for loss.

RESULTS:

The incidence of prospectively observed pregnancy loss was 28%, and the serum concentrations of PBDE congeners in females were consistently associated with a higher hazard of incident pregnancy loss. Specifically, statistically significant hazard ratios (HRs) for incident pregnancy loss were observed for lower brominated PBDE congeners: 17 (HR 1.23; CI: 1.07-1.42), 28 (HR 1.25; CI: 1.03-1.52), 66 (HR 1.23; CI: 1.07-1.42), and homolog triBDE (HR: 1.25; CI: 1.05-1.49). Findings were robust to various model specifications explored in sensitivity analyses.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal preconception serum concentrations of specific PBDE congeners may increase the hazard of incident pregnancy.

KEYWORDS:

Incident pregnancy loss; Longitudinal Investigation of Fertility and the Environment Study; Polybrominated diphenyl ethers

PMID:
30384231
PMCID:
PMC6294303
[Available on 2020-01-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.018

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center