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J Vet Intern Med. 2018 Nov;32(6):1983-1988. doi: 10.1111/jvim.15288. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Testing for Bartonella ssp. DNA in cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with inflammatory central nervous system disease.

Author information

1
From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado.
2
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neurobartonellosis occurs in people. The role these organisms might play in inflammatory brain disease of dogs is unclear.

HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES:

That Bartonella spp. DNA would be amplified more commonly from the CSF of dogs with inflammatory disease compared to those with noninflammatory disease. To report the prevalence of Bartonella spp. in dogs with and without inflammatory CNS disease with a commercially available PCR assay.

ANIMALS:

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 172 dogs from either Washington State University or Colorado State University.

METHODS:

Retrospective study. A search was performed of all medical records from dogs with CSF samples submitted to CSU's Center for Companion Animal Studies or Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory from CSU or WSU for Toxoplasma or Neospora PCR assay. Increased CSF nucleated cell counts and an adequate volume of CSF must have been present to evaluate Bartonella spp. by PCR assay.

RESULTS:

Inflammatory CNS disease was confirmed in 65 dogs, none of which were positive for Bartonella spp. DNA. Of the other 107 dogs, one was positive for B. henselae DNA. The CSF from this dog contained red blood cells.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

Failure to amplify Bartonella spp. DNA from the CSF of the dogs with inflammatory disease suggests the organism was not involved in the etiology of the disease, the organism was in the CNS tissues but not in the CSF, or the organism was present but in quantities undetectable by this PCR assay. The combination of PCR and culture is the most sensitive way to detect Bartonella spp. and the use of that technique should be considered in future studies.

KEYWORDS:

PCR; bartonellosis; encephalomyelitis; meningitis; protozoal

PMID:
30381844
PMCID:
PMC6271302
DOI:
10.1111/jvim.15288
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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