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Neuroimage Clin. 2018;20:1139-1147. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2018.09.032. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Clinical validation of automated hippocampal segmentation in temporal lobe epilepsy.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States.
2
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States.
3
Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States; Penn Image Computing and Science Lab, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States.
4
Department of Neurology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, United States.
5
Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States.
6
Department of Neurology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States; Penn Image Computing and Science Lab, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States.
7
Department of Neurology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States. Electronic address: Kathryn.Davis@uphs.upenn.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To provide a multi-atlas framework for automated hippocampus segmentation in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and clinically validate the results with respect to surgical lateralization and post-surgical outcome.

METHODS:

We retrospectively identified 47 TLE patients who underwent surgical resection and 12 healthy controls. T1-weighted 3 T MRI scans were acquired for all subjects, and patients were identified by a neuroradiologist with regards to lateralization and degree of hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Automated segmentation was implemented through the Joint Label Fusion/Corrective Learning (JLF/CL) method. Gold standard lateralization was determined from the surgically resected side in Engel I (seizure-free) patients at the two-year timepoint. ROC curves were used to identify appropriate thresholds for hippocampal asymmetry ratios, which were then used to analyze JLF/CL lateralization.

RESULTS:

The optimal template atlas based on subject images with varying appearances, from normal-appearing to severe HS, was demonstrated to be composed entirely of normal-appearing subjects, with good agreement between automated and manual segmentations. In applying this atlas to 26 surgically resected seizure-free patients at a two-year timepoint, JLF/CL lateralized seizure onset 92% of the time. In comparison, neuroradiology reads lateralized 65% of patients, but correctly lateralized seizure onset in these patients 100% of the time. When compared to lateralized neuroradiology reads, JLF/CL was in agreement and correctly lateralized all 17 patients. When compared to nonlateralized radiology reads, JLF/CL correctly lateralized 78% of the nine patients.

SIGNIFICANCE:

While a neuroradiologist's interpretation of MR imaging is a key, albeit imperfect, diagnostic tool for seizure localization in medically-refractory TLE patients, automated hippocampal segmentation may provide more efficient and accurate epileptic foci localization. These promising findings demonstrate the clinical utility of automated segmentation in the TLE MR imaging pipeline prior to surgical resection, and suggest that further investigation into JLF/CL-assisted MRI reading could improve clinical outcomes. Our JLF/CL software is publicly available at https://www.nitrc.org/projects/ashs/.

KEYWORDS:

Automated; Hippocampus; Segmentation; TLE

PMID:
30380521
PMCID:
PMC6205355
DOI:
10.1016/j.nicl.2018.09.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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