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Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol. 2018 Oct 30. doi: 10.1007/s00590-018-2325-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Effect of changing femoral head diameter on bony and prosthetic jumping angles.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, Takaramachi 13-1, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan.
2
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, Takaramachi 13-1, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan. tamonkabata@yahoo.co.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In THA, using a larger femoral head can increase the oscillation angle and jumping distance. However, there have been no reports which indicate precisely how increasing the jumping distance leads to an increase in the angle from impingement to dislocation (jumping angle). In this study, we clarified the jumping angle of various head diameters and its relationship with pelvic morphology.

METHODS:

Using a three-dimensional templating system, virtual THA and ROM simulations were performed in 82 patients. We investigated the distance between bony and prosthetic impingement points and the head centre and calculated the jumping angle for various head diameters. We measured various pelvic shapes and length to clarify the relationship between pelvic morphology and impingement distance.

RESULTS:

Jumping angles were 7.7° ± 3.2°, 12.1° ± 1.6°, 15.4° ± 2.5° and 10.0° ± 3.0° with flexion, internal rotation with 90° flexion (IR), extension and external rotation (ER), respectively, when we used a 22-mm head diameter. Bony jumping angle increased about 0.5°, 0.8°, 1.0° and 0.7° per 2-mm increase in head diameter with flexion, IR, extension and ER. On the other hand, prosthetic jumping angle remained almost stable at about 31°. Impingement distance was related to pelvic morphology in all directions. Bony jumping angles differed with ROM; the biggest was seen with extension, followed by IR, ER and flexion. On the other hand, bony jumping angle was less than prosthetic jumping angle in all cases.

CONCLUSION:

Bony jumping angles differed with ROM; the biggest was seen with extension, followed by IR, ER and flexion. Prosthetic impingement angles were stable. In addition, the bony jumping angle was less than the prosthetic jumping angle in all cases.

KEYWORDS:

Impingement distance; Jumping angle; Jumping distance; Total hip arthroplasty

PMID:
30377824
DOI:
10.1007/s00590-018-2325-5

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