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Nat Methods. 2018 Nov;15(11):936-939. doi: 10.1038/s41592-018-0171-3. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Stability, affinity, and chromatic variants of the glutamate sensor iGluSnFR.

Author information

1
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA, USA.
2
Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Jupiter, FL, USA.
3
Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
4
Department of Neuropathology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
5
Unit of Dynamic Neuronal Imaging and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
6
HHMI, Department of Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
7
Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Health, New York, NY, USA.
8
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
9
Princeton Neuroscience Institute and Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA.
10
Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA.
11
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
12
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA, USA. loogerl@janelia.hhmi.org.

Abstract

Single-wavelength fluorescent reporters allow visualization of specific neurotransmitters with high spatial and temporal resolution. We report variants of intensity-based glutamate-sensing fluorescent reporter (iGluSnFR) that are functionally brighter; detect submicromolar to millimolar amounts of glutamate; and have blue, cyan, green, or yellow emission profiles. These variants could be imaged in vivo in cases where original iGluSnFR was too dim, resolved glutamate transients in dendritic spines and axonal boutons, and allowed imaging at kilohertz rates.

PMID:
30377363
DOI:
10.1038/s41592-018-0171-3

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