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Mov Disord. 2018 Dec;33(12):1945-1950. doi: 10.1002/mds.27498. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Habitual exercisers versus sedentary subjects with Parkinson's Disease: Multimodal PET and fMRI study.

Author information

1
Pacific Parkinson's Research Centre, Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, University of British Columbia & Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
3
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The benefits of exercise in PD have been linked to enhanced dopamine (DA) transmission in the striatum.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine differences in DA release, reward signaling, and clinical features between habitual exercisers and sedentary subjects with PD.

METHODS:

Eight habitual exercisers and 9 sedentary subjects completed [11 C]raclopride PET scans before and after stationary cycling to determine exercise-induced release of endogenous DA in the dorsal striatum. Additionally, functional MRI assessed ventral striatum activation during reward anticipation. All participants completed motor (UPDRS III; finger tapping; and timed-up-and-go) and nonmotor (Beck Depression Inventory; Starkstein Apathy Scale) assessments.

RESULTS:

[11 C]Raclopride analysis before and after stationary cycling demonstrated greater DA release in the caudate nuclei of habitual exercisers compared to sedentary subjects (P < 0.05). Habitual exercisers revealed greater activation of ventral striatum during the functional MRI reward task (P < 0.05) and lower apathy (P < 0.05) and bradykinesia (P < 0.05) scores versus sedentary subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

Habitual exercise is associated with preservation of motor and nonmotor function, possibly mediated by increased DA release. This study formulates a foundation for prospective, randomized controlled studies. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

KEYWORDS:

Parkinson's disease; dopamine release; exercise; function magnetic resonance imaging; positron emission tomography

PMID:
30376184
DOI:
10.1002/mds.27498

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